IFS™ Integrated Furling System

OneSails IFS™ Integrated Furling System
The next generation of furling sails.

OneSails presents the IFS™ (Integrated Furling System), a new style of headsail and downwind sail construction which uses continuous fibre technology to create sails which can be furled without the use of a heavy and expensive anti-torsion cable.

IFS™ sails are designed to incorporate a net of continuous structural fibres, laid directly on to the sail’s luff, effectively replacing the cable. The advantages of this technology are considerable. A wider range of sail shapes can be set and furled with sail handling eased by the reduction in weight.

Thanks to the lower halyard tensions needed, 30% - 35% less than used with anti-torsion cable, it’s possible to avoid the need for a 2:1 halyard, reducing the sprit load and improving safety.

The IFS™ is a new sail concept with important advantages noticeable both when racing and cruising.

  1. Improved aerodynamic performance.
  2. Structure integrated within the sail which allows furling without an anti-torsion cable.
  3. Lower halyard tension by 35% when compared to a traditional sail with cable.
  4. Without a cable the sail’s luff can be designed to project forward and to windward, improving performance at wider angles.
  5. Easy to handle because the furled sail is light and can easily be folded to fit in its bag.
  6. Stable leech profile even if measured as a gennaker according to ORC and IRC rules.
  7. Lighter sail (without anti-torsion cable).
  8. Bespoke finishing and accessories.
Definitions Kod TWS (Knots) TWA (Degrees) Material
from till from till
C0 IFS 2 18 55 120 Membrane eller Laminate
Code 0 Upwind C0 IFS Upwind 2 15 50 110 Membrane eller Laminate
Code 0 ORC/IRC C0 IFS IRC 2 20 60 125 Membrane eller Laminate
Definitions Kod TWS (Knots) TWA (Degrees) Material
from till from till
AF0 3 18 65 130 Laminate eller Nylon
AF1 0 10 75 135 Nylon
AF3 10 25 95 140 Nylon
AF5 14 28 100 145 Nylon
Cruising asy IFS Cruising Asy 5 25 95 155 Nylon

IFS™ Tips & Tricks

  1. The sail doesn’t need too much luff tension for proper effective furling, just tight enough to make it straight.
  2. The best furling is achieved when sailing dead downwind, reducing the apparent wind to a minimum.
  3. When furling, the sheet should not be completely eased, it is better to keep a slight tension on it, accompanying the furl.
  4. It is advisable to always furl the sail in the same direction, as the top will furl more smoothly and tightly.
  5. Before hoisting again, make sure the top hasn’t unfurled, which can happen during the dropping and stowage.
  6. Once the sail is unfurled, halyard tension can be adjusted according to the sailing angle (tighter for reaching, looser for wider angles).
  7. Although the sail doesn’t require a lot of halyard tension, the integrated IFSTM structure can withstand heavy loads so care should be taken not to over tighten the halyard in order to prevent damage to the furler and other fittings.
  8. The sail should not be left hoisted when furled with the apparent wind exceeding around 12 knots.

WCO_blocktitle

1. WCO_title_1
WCO_text_1
2. WCO_title_2
WCO_text_2
3. WCO_title_3
WCO_text_3
4. WCO_title_4
WCO_text_4
5. WCO_title_5
WCO_text_5

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse this site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.
x